belaroos:

i just threw a french fry at my cat and he ate it

"Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

etherealzephyr:

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Earlier today, I served as the “young woman’s voice” in a panel of local experts at a Girl Scouts speaking event. One question for the panel was something to the effect of, "Should parents read their daughter’s texts or monitor her online activity for bad language and inappropriate content?"

I was surprised when the first panelist answered the question as if it were about cyberbullying. The adult audience nodded sagely as she spoke about the importance of protecting children online.

I reached for the microphone next. I said, “As far as reading your child’s texts or logging into their social media profiles, I would say 99.9% of the time, do not do that.”

Looks of total shock answered me. I actually saw heads jerk back in surprise. Even some of my fellow panelists blinked.

Everyone stared as I explained that going behind a child’s back in such a way severs the bond of trust with the parent. When I said, “This is the most effective way to ensure that your child never tells you anything,” it was like I’d delivered a revelation.

It’s easy to talk about the disconnect between the old and the young, but I don’t think I’d ever been so slapped in the face by the reality of it. It was clear that for most of the parents I spoke to, the idea of such actions as a violation had never occurred to them at all.

It alarms me how quickly adults forget that children are people.

Apparently people are rediscovering this post somehow and I think that’s pretty cool! Having experienced similar violations of trust in my youth, this is an important issue to me, so I want to add my personal story:

Around age 13, I tried to express to my mother that I thought I might have clinical depression, and she snapped at me “not to joke about things like that.” I stopped telling my mother when I felt depressed.

Around age 15, I caught my mother reading my diary. She confessed that any time she saw me write in my diary, she would sneak into my room and read it, because I only wrote when I was upset. I stopped keeping a diary.

Around age 18, I had an emotional breakdown while on vacation because I didn’t want to go to college. I ended up seeing a therapist for - surprise surprise - depression.

Around age 21, I spoke on this panel with my mother in the audience, and afterwards I mentioned the diary incident to her with respect to this particular Q&A. Her eyes welled up, and she said, “You know I read those because I was worried you were depressed and going to hurt yourself, right?”

TL;DR: When you invade your child’s privacy, you communicate three things:

  1. You do not respect their rights as an individual.
  2. You do not trust them to navigate problems or seek help on their own.
  3. You probably haven’t been listening to them.

Information about almost every issue that you think you have to snoop for can probably be obtained by communicating with and listening to your child.

Part of me is really excited to see that the original post got 200 notes because holy crap 200 notes, and part of me is really saddened that something so negative has resonated with so many people.

enbymage:

stop erasing aromantic ppl 2k14

hominisaevum:

Glaive of the Bodyguard of Guglielmo Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua and Monferrato

Date: about 1575

Culture: Italian

Medium: Etched steel, wood

Classification: Shafted Weapons

zoryrory:

The sheath has a pretty carved dragon and is a lighter wood, but sturdy.
There’s where you hold the glaive with one hand.
The pommel is nice and sturdy as well; I’d prefer it to be sharper, but it can still do some damage when you use force with the hit.
There is the blade, nice and sharp and lethal.
The whole glaive is about 5 feet in height, so perfect for a person who is 5 feet and up… not for little hobbits though, I feel like they would have some difficulty with this particular weapon.

I hope you like my weapon of choice!

thestinakatdraws:

After weeks of wacky behavior my scanner mysteriously began working today… so here’s some drawings!

If you’re not reading Wolves of the North by ShinjiShazaki, you better get on it RIGHT NOW. I loved how Christa and Annie interacted… okay,  no, I loved how everyone interacted. Maybe tomorrow I’ll draw the Zhinganshina trio, as soon as I design some outfits… I hope you don’t mind me taking liberties with the clothing, I’m making this up as I go along…

thestinakatdraws:

Here’s the Zhinganshina trio! If anyone is interested in the designs I’d be glad to talk about them in detail, but in a nutshell it was something like mixing and matching pieces of military uniforms from various countries and time periods until I was satisfied.

Eren is my favorite and came to me easily. Mikasa feels kind of eh but I cant help but be satisfied just because it’s Mikasa. Armin was really difficult, probably because I’ve never actually… drawn him before… I need to work on it some more.

I think Christa has a little crush on Mikasa and you can’t convince me otherwise (but let’s be real—who doesn’t crush on Mikasa??).

prussiya:

stop romanticizing cotton eye joe

incendavery:

ANGRY MUSIC FOR ANGRY QUEERS

I. ANTHEM - PANSY DIVISION // II. GIA - FABULOUS DISASTER // III. GAY RUDE BOYS UNITE - LEFTOVER CRACK // IV. DON’T CALL ME FABULOUS - HUNX + HIS PUNX // V. LESS TALK, MORE ROCK - PROPAGHANDI // VI. I LOVE HARDCORE BOYS / I LOVE BOYS HARDCORE - LIMP WRIST // VII. REBEL GIRL - BIKINI KILL // VIII. TRANSGENDER DYSPHORIA BLUES - AGAINST ME!

LISTEN 

elakudark:

Warrior ladies in practical armour are 100% more attractive than warrior ladies in battle bikinis and this is a scientific fact

(Also 100% likelier to survive)

stop-chicken-nugget-abuse:

nevvzealand:

happy birthday someone

I like reblogging this becaUSE WHAT IF YOU SAW THIS ON YOUR BIRTHDAY HOW COOL WOULD THAT BE